Category Archives: WordPress Development

What Can You Do With Your API Key?

Update as of 03/05/2011: The following post is for older version of WordPress.com (before version 3.0?). Now everything is changed. In order to find your API key, you need to login to your WordPress.com blog first, then visit this web address: https://apikey.wordpress.com/: it will tell your WordPress.com username as well as your API key.

If you have a WordPress.com blog, You can find your API (Application Programming Interface) key by clicking on Users/Your Profile. It says, “Your WordPress.com API key is: ########d#db. Don’t share your API key, it’s like a password,” where ######## should be replaced with numbers. API key comes automatically when you registered a Free blog with WordPress.com. In order to learn more about it, I searched around on the web. Here is the original information I got from WordPress.com. It says,

API Keys

WordPress.com has what’s called “API keys” which allow you to use services and enhancements built on the WordPress.com platform. This allows you to leverage the power of WP.com while still hosting your blog elsewhere.

How do I get one?

When you sign up for a WordPress.com account we will email you an API key. If you already have a WordPress.com account, your API key is listed on your profile page, which you can get to by clicking the “My Account” link in the top right when you’re logged in.

Where will my API key be?

It will be in your welcome email. To make sure you get the email, avoid free services like Hotmail and MSN and check your spam filter if it doesn’t show up in a few minutes. (Also, consider whitelisting *@wordpress.com.)

Can I share my API key?

No, it’s like a password to your account.

What can I do with my API key?

One example is the new anti-spam service, Akismet. Install the Akismet plugin and enter your WP.com API key and your blog will be protected from spam the same way every blog on WordPress.com is.

In the future it will also give you access to stats and other add-on services.

So if you like to have a WordPress.com API key for personal use, then you know what to do now. However, for the purpose of commercial use, check out Commercial Use API Keys here.

What can you do with your API key? Is this post helpful? Please leave a comment below.

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Where Did ‘Possible related posts’ Come From?

Today I found out that something I didn’t write but showed up as Possible related posts in one of my posts. I checked my original post I’d written; but did not see anything showing up like those links there. I was wondering where did they come from.

I searched WordPress.com Forum and I found an answer to this mystery: How do I remove something I didn’t write from a post?. Actually WordPress.com provides extra features. See the screenshot below:Possible Related Posts

You can find them by clicking on Design/Extras from your WordPress.com Dashboard. If you leave the second one as default, which is unchecked, then Possible related posts will show up in your post. I don’t mind to use it as long as the links to my posts are relevant. However I don’t like the fact that once you chose to use this feature you can’t control what links to be shown; and not all of the Possible related posts are relevant anyway.

Where did ‘possible related posts’ come from? Would you like to turn it on? Why or why not? Please leave a comment below.

Note: Now Appearance is used instead of Design.